Posted February 23, 2019 by Laurie Kay Olson

Animals have been a part of the television industry pretty much from the start, especially in Westerns where horses were a necessity. One of these Westerns was the highly popular "Bonanza." When the show ended in 1973 after 14 seasons, actor Lorne Greene, who portrayed the patriarch, Ben Cartwright, found that he had become very attached to his horse. He was gravely concerned that the buckskin, cleverly named Buck, would end up in the "glue factory."

Posted January 31, 2019 by Ron Callari

Making money off of your pets seems somewhat counter-intuitive. Don't we adopt pets to be our companions? Yet 'stage moms' like Gypsy Rose Lee and the term 'momager' first introduced by Kris Jenner who promotes her brood of Kardashians have been cashing in on their progeny for quite some time now.

Posted December 17, 2018 by Laurie Kay Olson

The new reboot of the TV show Murphy Brown has much of the charm and incisive bite of the original show. In one very vital way the new show has really kicked it up a notch -- Murphy now has a dog. Not just any dog either. Little Benny Brown is a handicapped dog in a wheelchair. While it may sound a bit gimmicky, the dog is adorable and, for the most part, just treated as a regular dog.

Posted December 7, 2018 by Ron Callari

This past June, Sully, the service dog was commissioned for a very important mission.

Posted December 5, 2018 by Creature Features

Fat Freddy's Cat from counterculture artist Gilbert Shelton's Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers comics has been immortalized as a limited edition figurine.

Posted August 17, 2018 by Ron Callari

A glass ceiling is a metaphor used to describe an invisible barrier that keeps a given demographic (typically applied to minorities or a certain class or gender) from rising beyond a certain level in a hierarchy.

Posted July 22, 2018 by Ron Callari

Each year more than 7 million dogs and cats remain at animal shelters in the U.S. instead of loving homes. Nearly fifty percent of them must be euthanizes when they are not house in no-kill centers.

Posted July 19, 2018 by Laurie Kay Olson

Bob Ross may have been best known for teaching people to paint happy little clouds and happy little trees on his PBS television show "The Joy of Painting." There was another side to him that viewers were sometimes introduced to on air -- his love of animals. He had a penchant for rescuing wild animals and working to raise or rehabilitate them -- from baby squirrels to baby owls.