The 7 Worst Foods You Can Feed Your Cat

 

 

A healthy diet can help prevent these diseases: image via vet-pet-health-advice.comA healthy diet can help prevent these diseases: image via vet-pet-health-advice.com

Chances are you are feeding your cat junk food.  I'm sure it's not intentional.  Maybe you don't know that the dry foods with the fish shapes and bright colors are like cocaine to your cat.  A few bites of his cat kibble will make his blood sugar jump sky high, because he does not have the enzymes necessary to digest starch.  It's BAD for him, and it causes all kinds of illnesses, long term.

The optimal food for your cat is the one that mirrors his ancestral, pre-domesticated, diet - the one he ate in the wild.  That means a diet rich in protein and low in grains.  Cats don't eat grains in the wild, nor do they eat gluten, by-products, meal, artificial coloring, flavoring, or preservatives, yet most cat foods contain all of these as their primary ingredients.  Ideally a cat diet, whether it is wet or dry food, or the combination of both, should contain 75 percent protein and 25 percent fruits and vegetables. And these foods should be approved for humans.

Wet, home-cooked or canned, should make up at least half of a cat's diet, because cats do not tend to be water drinkers and wet food satisfies his need for moisture like his ancestors had when they ate live mice and fish. To see the foods, wet and dry, that contain the best ingredients for your cats, visit The Top 5 Cat Foods, which I recently compiled.

Though these cat foods are dry, their canned food counterparts are equally bad for your cat's health. You can click on the names below to see the detailed ingredients for these products for yourself. Don't be swayed by the glowing reviews. These really are 7 of the worst foods you can feed your cat:

 

1.  9 Lives Cat Food

(Not with this food!)

Ingredients: Whole ground corn, poultry by-product meal, corn gluten meal, soybean meal, whole wheat, meat & bone meal, animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols), salmon, chicken, beef, animal digest, salt, phosphoric acid, choline chloride, titanium dioxide, potassium chloride, vitamins (vitamin E supplement, niacin supplement, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin supplement, vitamin A supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, menadione sodium bisulfite complex, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, vitamin D3 supplement), taurine, minerals (ferrous sulfate, zinc oxide, manganous oxide, copper sulfate, calcium iodate, sodium selenite), red 40, yellow 5, yellow 6, potassium sorbate (used as a preservative), BHA (used as a preservative), blue 1, rosemary extract.

 

 

2.  Fancy Feast (Filet Mignon Flavor) Cat Food

The 'Filet Mignon Flavor' is a dead ringer for 'fake food.'


Ingredients: Ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), soybean meal, animal liver flavor, phosphoric acid, calcium carbonate, salt, potassium chloride, oceanfish meal, albacore tuna meal, salmon meal, yellowfin tuna meal, crab meal, dried seaweed, choline chloride, taurine, zinc sulfate, added color (Yellow 5, Yellow 6, Red 40, Blue 2), ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, Vitamin E supplement, calcium phosphate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, copper sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite.

 

3. Friskies Cat Food

What in this list resembles food?


Ingredients: Ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), soybean meal, animal liver flavor, phosphoric acid, calcium carbonate, salt, potassium chloride, oceanfish meal, albacore tuna meal, salmon meal, yellowfin tuna meal, crab meal, dried seaweed, choline chloride, taurine, zinc sulfate, added color (Yellow 5, Yellow 6, Red 40, Blue 2), ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, Vitamin E supplement, calcium phosphate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, copper sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite.

 

4.  Kit 'N Kaboodle Cat Food

The whole Kit 'N Kaboodle, but most of it ends in 'ide,' 'ate,' or 'ine.'


Ingredients: Ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, soybean meal, meat and bone meal, beef tallow preserved with mixed-tocopherols (source of Vitamin E), oceanfish meal, turkey by-product meal, phosphoric acid, salt, brewers dried yeast, animal digest, potassium chloride, tetra sodium pyrophosphate, choline chloride, calcium carbonate, taurine, L-Lysine monohydrochloride, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, added color (Red 40, Blue 2, Yellow 5, Yellow 6), glyceryl monostearate, L-Alanine, manganese sulfate, vitamin supplements (E, A, B-12, D-3), niacin, copper sulfate, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, citric acid, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite.

 

5. Purina One Cat Food

This is Purina's mid-priced food. At least chicken is the first ingredient, but I rate everything below that bad for your cat. 


Ingredients: Chicken, brewers rice, corn gluten meal, poultry by-product meal, wheat flour, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), whole grain corn, fish meal, soy protein isolate, animal liver flavor, phosphoric acid, potassium chloride, calcium carbonate, caramel color, salt, choline chloride, taurine, L-Lysine monohydrochloride, Vitamin E supplement, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, copper sulfate, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite.

 

6.  Science Diet Cat Food

Seen this in your vet's office?  Its ingredients are just as bad as the others...


Chicken By-Product Meal, Ground Whole Grain Corn, Brewers Rice, Animal Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken Liver Flavor, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Sulfate, Choline Chloride, vitamins (L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Iodized Salt, Vitamin E Supplement, Taurine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), preserved with Mixed Tocopherols and Citric Acid, Beta-Carotene, Rosemary Extract.

 

7. Whiskas Cat Food

Five main ingredients: corn, meal, meal, fat, and flavor.


Ingredients: Ground Yellow Corn, Chicken By-product Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Animal Fat (Preserved with BHA/BHT), Natural Poultry Flavor, Wheat Flour, Rice, Brewers Dried Yeast, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Turkey By-product Meal, Caramel Color, Calcium Carbonate, dl-Methionine, Taurine, Trace Minerals (Zinc Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Potassium Iodide), White Fish Meal, Vitamins (dl-Alpha Tocopherol).

 

It's worth it to buy your cat good quality food, one that will make her healthy, give her energy, and make her coat shine.  She'll thank you for it, believe me.

See the Top 5 Cat Foods To Feed Your Cat now.

 

sources:  Pet Food Talk, Pet Food Ratings

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Lady Bee
Pet News
PetsLady.com

Comments
Jun 1, 2012
by Anonymous
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I have to agree with you on

I have to agree with you on this...but....I fed my first cat Whiskas for most of his life and he lived til age 18.

But....I do agree with you!

Oct 16, 2013
by Anonymous
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I fed my cat Meow Mix & she

I fed my cat Meow Mix & she lived to 18. The two cats I have now have been fed expensive "natural" food (Made in China) & one has renal failure at 12 yrs. & the other has Immune Deficiency Disease at 9yrs. Now the former is on Hill's canned Px k/d diet. The other is on Purina UR dry. At least they're not made in China. There've been no recalls & if Chinese companies put melamine in human baby formula, what will they try to get away with in pet food? Plus, have you ever heard of the Annual Dog Meat Festival in China? Enough said.

Jan 23, 2014
by Anonymous
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So what are the good

So what are the good choices??

Jan 30, 2015
by Anonymous
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Nutrients are more important

Nutrients are more important than ingredients alone. Unless you know that, an ingredients list doesn't mean much.

Mar 24, 2015
by Anonymous
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It is important to realise

It is important to realise that the sources of the ingredients in these popular foods has changed over the last few years, and therefore you cannot compare these products to the same ones a few years back. Indeed, every batch varies in chemical or toxicity content. Many dogs and cats are suddenly becoming acutely ill, some dying, after their owner opens a new bag of a product they have been using for some time.

May 8, 2015
by Anonymous
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halo brand, merrick brand,

halo brand, merrick brand, blue buffalo, candice brand... grain free, corn free. cook for your pet. holistic section, natural foods

Oct 17, 2015
by Anonymous
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In the wild, they most

In the wild, they most certainly do eat grains and by-product. Bobcats and lions eat the stomach and intestines of whatever they catch (aka by-product). Inside those intestines are grasses, etc from what the herbivore ate. It's nowhere near as much as is in these foods, but it is certainly present.

Also, grain-free does not mean the food is filler-free. They replace these grains with things like potatoes. There is ALWAYS a filler unless you go to a completely raw diet, which, is a diet which is still up for debate as a diet cats should be on because they need balance as well.

Nov 22, 2015
by Anonymous
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I took in a stray kitten

I took in a stray kitten that was scrawny, and basically the skeleton of a cat and got him fixed and back up to weight, I tried all sorts of cat food including Blue Buffalo and Merrick and even the cheaper stuff like iams for sensitive stomach and everything gave him diarrhea, unfortunately he was diagnosed with IBD the only thing that didn't give him diarrhea is the Hill's Prescription diet i/d. He is now a HEALTHY, HAPPY 1 1/2 YEAR OLD KITTY! Cats are like humans, something that doesn't agree with my stomach may agree with your stomach. if I have to feed my cat an "inferior" cat food to give him a life that he can actually enjoy I will. Some cats need the extra fiber in their diets and just because you are on a health food kick doesn't mean your cat also needs to be too because you could be doing more harm than good

Nov 23, 2015
by Anonymous
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By product simply means it

By product simply means it is a part of the animal that it was not raised to be harvested for. In other words, most chickens are raised to harvest the breasts, and anything else would be a by product. So, liver, kidney, etc etc would be by products. These are put in your pets food to provide essential nutrients, so things "that end in ine and ene" don't have to be added to supplement (which by the way, majority if the things that end in ine and ene are essential amino acids or other nutrients. Just because you don't understand the science words doesn't mean you should bash them). "meal" is simply dehydrated product, meaning the nutrients in the product are more concentrated, which is good. You call yourself the pets lady, but you need to get some facts straight. Two of the foods you have on this list (science diet and Purina one) are some of the best foods available for your cat. I sincerely hope no one takes your advice from this list.

Nov 23, 2015
by Anonymous
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Science diet and Purina one

Science diet and Purina one are excellent choices. Highly recommended by veterinarians (I would know, I am one and work with them)

Dec 2, 2015
by Anonymous
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I call BS on this article.

I call BS on this article. Many of those ingredients are necessary for cats - especially Taurine. Funny, my vet recommends Purina, Royal Canin and Science Diet. None of these dry foods have ever been recalled. She's seen too many issues with Blue Buffalo to recommend it. But she prefers we feed the best CANNED food we can afford over any dry food.

Dec 17, 2015
by Anonymous
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Dear Pet Lady, thank you for

Dear Pet Lady, thank you for your thoughts and for your very pretty icon. Below is a link that you may appreciate.

The thing that stood out for me most in the bad ingredients was any artificial colors; to me it is SO pointless to add artificial dyes to animal food -- as if they care! And of course the red and yellow dyes are now highly suspect even with children, who weigh more than cats... so I steer far from them.

A note on the -ates and the 'ines: this is just sci-talk, nothing to veer away from; when creating food, to enhance their vitamin and mineral content, sources of these vitamins and minerals are added. You may not agree with it, but since most dry food is not fresh, it makes sense to me to have trusted additives. Here is a link that tries to explain what the -ines and -ates are providing.

http://www.naturalnews.com/Report_pet_food_ingredients_4.html

This is what I think your page is missing, and that some commenters are responding to; the ingredients list is not self-explanatory and it would be great to highlight, explain, and therefore understand what is bad and what is actually all right, within each concoction.

My best to you and your feathered and finned and furred friends, jmarie

Feb 26, 2016
by Anonymous
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Fromm is, in my humble

Fromm is, in my humble opinion the best dog or cat food on the market today.

Feb 27, 2016
by Anonymous
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So am I to understand that

So am I to understand that what I'm feeding my cats(Meow Mix-dry) and some canned Friskies. That none of this food is not good for them? Then should I go to the above mentioned foods for them. All this time and not once have they taken I'll with exception of a cold. Really confused and need to talk to their vet. I only want the best for my cats since they are the kids in my house. Lololol

Apr 2, 2016
by Anonymous
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Yeah, so here is my take. I

Yeah, so here is my take. I have tried the so called "holistic/natural/they are meant to be wild animal" food and one of my cats vomits and the other gained to much weight with the recommended amount. Have tried Blue Buffalo, vomit, IAMS, vomit. Household cats are domesticated, they're DNAs have changed over time. Cats ate not human as most of you should know, they are not meant to neither be vegans nor be pure protein (Atkins, which have lead to kidney failures). Just give your cat whats good for them and take them every year to the vet for full checkup to make sure they are healthy.

May 6, 2016
by Anonymous
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Agreed. The Taurine and

Agreed. The Taurine and L-Carnitine are essential amino acids which means they have to get this from their diet, mainly from bugs and other critters which most domestic cats do not have access to. I agree with this writer that a lot of cat owners are ignorant to nutrition and spare no criticism of amino acids and other nutrients like ascorbic acid, "by products" in their cat food, just because it doesn't sound like "whole buffalo leg" which they can readily identify. Let the nutritionists, who are college educated, formulate your cat food. they spent 20 years in school learning how. Housewives cannot match that expertise.

May 22, 2016
by Anonymous
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You are slowly poisoning

You are slowly poisoning your pet by feeding any pet food containing any form of:
Menadione-sodium bisulfite
Sodium selenite (actually sulfuric acid)
Selenium
Copper sulfate
BHA
Liquid Char
Hydrochloric Acid (hydrochloride)
Sodium arsenite
I can send you the MSDS (material safety data sheets) to prove it.

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